Training 13/17 Jan

two karate men sensei and  teenager students teacher teaching isolated on white background

We had a great time last week with lots of new visitors and hit
an all time high since beginning training at Fort Hood – 20 people!
I am looking forward to another great week. Invite your friends
and come back.

Training Schedule, Mon & Thurs.

1800-1830: School age kids class (5-10 year old)
1830-1930: All Students ages 10 years to Adult.

This Week’s Training

This week we continue to focus on foundational concepts including basic stances, blocks, punches, and kicks. We will look at applications of those techniques in the Hyungs (forms), Il Soo Sik (one-steps), and Won-Hyong Dae-Ryun (circular sparing). Please take time to explore our loaded resource page.


Meditation for the Week

revised-woodcut-scale-800x533Integrity – Righteousness guards him whose way is blameless, but sin overthrows the wicked. (Proverbs 13:6)  The Greek words aletheia and alethes are translated as “integrity” in the New Testament and mean “truth or the state of being true.” Jesus is referred to as a man of integrity because He lived wholly in accordance with God’s complete truth. In Mark 12:14, the Gospel writer records,  “They came to him and said, ‘Teacher, we know you are a man of integrity. You aren’t swayed by men, because you pay no attention to who they are; but you teach the way of God in accordance with the truth.’”

A person of moral integrity is the same in the dark as in the light
— not double-minded with contradictory thoughts, words and actions.
— not pretending to have virtues or qualities that are really not present in the heart (hypocrisy) (Matthew 23:28)
— not focusing on temporal gain but on growing in godly character (Psalm 15)

A person of moral integrity is one who …
— does what is righteous
— speaks the truth in love
— does not falsely accuse another
— does not harm a neighbor
— does not gossip
— despises evil men
— honors those who love the Lord
— keeps his or her word
— lends money without gain
— does not accept bribes
To have moral integrity is to be undivided and consistent in your mind, will and emotions regarding what is right and wrong.

Advertisements
Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Soar TSD Training, 7/10 Jan

Hey All, I hope it’s been great Christmas and Holiday break for you. Now it’s time to get back at it. We resume class on 7 Jan at 1800 with a slight change to the schedule.

TrainingSchedule Change

1800-1830: School age kids class (5-10 year old)
1830-1930: All Students ages 10 years to Adult.

This Week’s Training

Related image

This week we focus on foundational concepts including basic stances, blocks, punches, and kicks. I will look at applications of those techniques in the Hyungs (forms), Il Soo Sik (one-steps), and Won-Hyong Dae-Ryun (circular sparing).


Meditation for the Week

Perseverance – “And let us not grow weary of doing good, for in due season we will reap, if we do not give up.” (Galatians 6:9)

“… in the middle of the pain there is some hidden gift. I, more and more in my life, have discovered that the gifts of life are often hidden in the places that hurt most.” (Henri Nouwen, as cited in Henri Nouwen and Soul Care by Wil Hernandez)

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Training 10/13 Dec

This Week’s Training

Image result for karate basicsThis week I want to continue to focus on foundational concepts including basic stances, blocks, punches, and kicks. I will look at applications of those techniques in the Hyungs (forms), Il Soo Sik (one-steps), and Won-Hyong Dae-Ryun (circular sparing).

Note: We will not conduct class 24 Dec – 4 Jan.


Meditation for the Week

Indomitable Spirit: Don’t Quit!  “Let us not grow weary of doing good, for in due season we will reap, if we do not give up. 10 So then, as we have opportunity, let us do good to everyone, and especially to those who are of the household of faith.” (Galatians 6:9–10)

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Training Focus 3/6 Nov

This Week’s Training

This week I want to focus on foundational concepts including basic stances, blocks, punches, and kicks. I will look at applications of those techniques in the Hyungs (forms), Il Soo Sik (one-steps), and Won-Hyong Dae-Ryun (circular sparing).

.


Meditation for the Week

Humility: Charles Spurgeon said, “Humility is to make a right estimate of one’s self. It is not humility for a man to think less of himself than he ought, though it might rather puzzle him to do that.” There is humility in recognizing the gifts and talents God has innately placed in you and developed in you. Humility is to use the gifts and talents God has given you in service to others and for the glory of God.

The psalmist wrote, “Great is our Lord, and abundant in power; his understanding is beyond measure. The LORD lifts up the humble; he casts the wicked to the ground” (Psalm 147:5-6). Jesus said in Matthew 20:28, “…the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.” 

Go exercise the gifts and talents God gave you for the benefit of others and to bring glory to God in heaven. The Lord will lift you up.

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Training Focus 26/29 Nov – Ho Sin Sul

karate-fullThis Week’s Training

This week’s focus will be on Ho Sin Sul – Self-defense one-steps – and on Concentration. Be prepared to spend some time in practicing forms. We are exploring some new material this week.


Meditation for the Week

Concentration: the ability to focus mental effort. When is concentration necessary? Concentration is necessary in learning and improving skills. It takes work to learn the basic actions and concentration to practice them until they are perfected. Concentration is evidenced in the forms through eye-focus, intent, balance and clean execution of techniques. How else is concentration used?

In the Christian faith, Hebrews 2:1 says, “Therefore we must pay much closer attention to what we have heard, lest we drift away from it.” The writer is referring to sound doctrine taught to young/new christians. These poignant truths must be reviewed, or the young christian may become influenced by the teachings of society and culture drifting away from the centerline of truth. This principle is also appropriate in Tang Soo Do. We must review, pay close attention, concentrate on the basics of the Tang Soo Do Art. Failure to do so can cause great injury and the inability to progress to more difficult techniques and forms.

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Training Focus 19 Nov – Forms

We continue our focus on Hyungs this week, since we are only meeting on Monday this week due to the Thanksgiving celebration. It’s in the hyungs that Concentration (Chung Shin Tong Il, our 2nd tenet) finds its most obvious depiction. It takes immense concentration and perseverance to develop the foundation that hyungs teach us: our balance points, our length & reach, the moving of our center of gravity. Everything we learn in Tang Soo Do is extrapolated from the hyungs/forms.


Meditation for the Week

Self-Control – “A man without self-control is like a city broken into and left without walls. (Proverbs 25:28)

Gichin Funakoshi repeatedly pointed out that the first purpose in pursuing this art is the nurturing of a sublime spirit, a spirit of humility. Even the older practitioners placed stronger emphasis on the spiritual side of the art than on the techniques. It is said that in the training of body and spirit, and above all else, one should treat his opponent courteously and with the proper etiquette. It is not enough to fight with all one’s power; the real objective in Karate-Do is to do so for the sake of justice. The quality necessary to accomplish this is self-control. Funakoshi stated that: “To become a victor, one must first overcome his own self”.

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Training Focus 12/15 Nov – Forms

feature-upblock

Our focus in training this week is Hyungs (Forms) both open hand and weapons. It’s in the hyungs that Concentration (Chung Shin Tong Il, our 2nd tenet) finds its most obvious depiction. It takes immense concentration and perseverance to develop the foundation that hyungs teach us: our balance points, our length & reach, the moving of our center of gravity. Everything we learn in Tang Soo Do is extrapolated from the hyungs.


Meditation for the Week

Respect and Obedience* – “Have confidence in your leaders and submit to their authority, because they keep watch over you as those who must give an account. Do this so that their work will be a joy, not a burden, for that would be of no benefit to you. (Hebrews 13:17)

“Obedience is an act of faith; disobedience is the result of unbelief.” ~ Edwin Louis Cole, founder of the Christian Men’s Network.


Some Thoughts on Hyungs

Hyung means Form or Shape, so it is the pure form/shape of martial arts, but martial art styles are like water; they start like a river and end up like a tsunami. That’s why there are so many hyungs, like there are rivers. Water takes no damage and always runs it’s cdb7a14dcdd925ef050e7401fa69f73fcourse no matter the obstacles.

There is a very old belief that in order to achieve balance you have to be equally good in principle and in practice, usually this is explained with the example of a two-wheeled cart which should be self-explanatory.

Hyung in a way is knowing the martial art you dedicate yourself to; it’s a very practical way of studying a very abstract concept while doing it. It is also a way of learning strategy and tactics, so hyung is the martial art, the collection of hyung is the style of the martial arts. That is why it is so important.

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Training Focus (Soo-Ki, Hands)–Nov 5 & 8

Our training focus is on Soo-Ki (Hands) One-Steps this week. We will continue to build on our first form – Sae Kye Hyung Il Bu. The basics of the forms is just a “text book,” but it is our job and responsibility to interpret and apply the information within the text book.

 


Meditation for the Week

Respect* and Obedience – “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets.” (Matthew 7:12)

“This is the final test of a gentleman; his respect for those who can be of no possible service to him.” ~ William Lyon Phelps, American author, critic and scholar


Hydration for Athletes

familydoctor.org editorial staff | May 2017

Whether you’re a serious athlete or simply exercise for recreation, it’s important to stay hydrated. Good hydration means getting the right amount of water before, during, and after exercise. Water regulates your body temperature and lubricates your joints. It helps transport nutrients to give you energy and keep you healthy. If you’re not hydrated, your body can’t perform at its highest level. You may feel tired, have muscle cramps, dizziness, or other serious symptoms.

shutterstock_331534634-705x471.jpg

Path to improved health
A simple way to make sure you’re staying properly hydrated is to check your urine. If your urine is usually colorless or light yellow, you are most likely well hydrated. Dark yellow or amber-colored urine can be a sign of dehydration.

How much water should I drink while exercising?
There are no exact rules for how much water to drink while exercising, because everyone is different. You need to consider factors including your sweat rate, the heat and humidity in your environment, and how long and hard you are exercising.

The American Council on Exercise has suggested the following basic guidelines for drinking water before, during, and after exercise:

  • Drink 17 to 20 ounces of water 2 to 3 hours before you start exercising.
  • Drink 8 ounces of water 20 to 30 minutes before you start exercising or during your warm-up.
  • Drink 7 to 10 ounces of water every 10 to 20 minutes during exercise.
  • Drink 8 ounces of water no more than 30 minutes after you exercise.

Athletes may want to measure how much fluid they lose during exercise to get a more specific measurement of how much water to drink (16 to 24 ounces of water for every pound of body weight lost).

What about sports drinks?
For most people, water is all that is needed to stay hydrated. However, if you will be exercising at a high intensity for longer than an hour, a sports drink may be helpful. The calories, potassium, and other nutrients in sports drinks can provide energy and electrolytes to help you perform for a longer period of time.

Choose a sports drink wisely. They are often high in calories from added sugar and may contain high levels of sodium. Also, check the serving size. One bottle may contain several servings. If you drink the entire bottle, you may need to double or triple the amounts given on the nutrition facts label. Some sports drinks contain caffeine. If you consume a sports drink that contains caffeine, be careful not to add too much caffeine to your diet. Caffeine may cause a diuretic effect on your body. This means that you may have to urinate more often.

Things to consider
Dehydration happens when you lose more fluid than you drink. When your body doesn’t have enough water, it can’t work properly. Dehydration can range from mild to severe. Symptoms of dehydration can include the following:

  • dizziness or lightheaded feeling
  • nausea or vomiting
  • muscle cramps
  • dry mouth
  • lack of sweating
  • hard, fast heartbeat

Symptoms of severe dehydration can include mental confusion, weakness, and loss of consciousness. You should get emergency medical attention immediately if you have any of these symptoms.

What is heat illness?
Heat illness can occur when your body is dehydrated and can’t cool itself effectively during exercise in hot or humid weather. There are 3 stages of heat illness:

  1. Heat cramps
  2. Heat exhaustion
  3. Heatstroke

Symptoms of heat cramps include painful muscle spasms in the legs, stomach, arms, or back. Symptoms of heat exhaustion are more serious. They can include faint or weak feelings, nausea, headache, fast heartbeat, and low blood pressure.

The most serious heat-related illness is heatstroke. Symptoms can include high body temperature (higher than 104°F), fast heartbeat, flushed skin, fast breathing, and possibly even delirium, loss of consciousness, or seizures. You should get emergency medical attention immediately if you experience any of the symptoms of heatstroke. Untreated heatstroke can lead to death.

How much water is too much?
This depends on your body and the kind of activity you are doing. Talk to your family doctor if you have questions about the right amount of water to drink while exercising.

When to see a doctor
You should see a doctor immediately if you have symptoms of dehydration, heat exhaustion, or heatstroke. You should also see a doctor if you have symptoms of a rare condition called hyponatremia. These include confusion, headache, vomiting, and swelling of the hands and feet.

Questions for your doctor
How much water should I drink each day?
How much more water should I drink when I am exercising?
What is the best way for me to prevent dehydration?
Am I more at risk for becoming dehydrated?
Does altitude affect hydration?

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

No TSD Class This Week

Unfortunatelno_classes_signy, I will need to cancel formal training this week (29 Oct and 1 Nov) due toTDY mission requirements.  I highly encourage you to practice what you have learned. Get your practice time in!

Next Week, we will return to a normal schedule. Please be patient with me as we get through these next few field exercises between now and Spring.

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Foot 발 Training 훈련(22 & 25 Oct)

10771472213_aaccd9b820_h.jpgOne of the distinctive features of Tang Soo Do in relation to the other Karate systems is the use of dynamic kicking techniques. Which is why we are working on foot techniques and training this weeks, and along with out kicking one-steps, I offer two additional challenges:

  1. Moving off-line (changing the angle) with a variety counter kicking techniques while still employing the modified middle knife hand guarding block we worked on last week.
  2. The six-directional kick which is a series of 6 consecutive kicking techniques used to train balance and loads while changing hip and foot position.

Meditation for the Week

Perseverance – “And let us not grow weary of doing good, for in due season we will reap, if we do not give up.” (Galatians 6:9)

“… in the middle of the pain there is some hidden gift. I, more and more in my life, have discovered that the gifts of life are often hidden in the places that hurt most.” (Henri Nouwen, as cited in Henri Nouwen and Soul Care by Wil Hernandez)


What is a Karate Gi?

From: the-martial-way.com

Note: The author is writing about the martial arts uniform. In Japanese it’s called the Gi, and in Korean we call it the Dobok (도복). I find the what Sensei Harris is writing speaks to why I don’t like working out in just t-shirts.

What is it? Is it just a piece of clothing, just equipment or something more than that? Of course it is a great piece of equipment, made to let you move without restrains, made to keep you warm, but in the same time to let you sweat. It is the type of equipment that helps you perform your technics better, with more control, with more accuracy, a garment that sometimes also camouflages your body from straight punches and kicks, it has no buttons or zippers, and for sure, hides your bruises. And that’s it? Oh, no, this is just the beginning, although for many it ends here.

Your karate gi was initially a traditional working equipment used by Japanese farmers in the country side. It was used because it was comfortable. But, as you all know, in the Japanese culture nothing is what it appears to be and everything has more meanings. The belt is made to keep your kimono tight, but also, the knot has a energetic function, it applies pressure on your hara, where the Japanese believe our soul lives, where the Indians locate Svadisthana chakra, our sacred chakra where our life force resides. Even the way the belt is tight resembles the way the chakra rotates.

In the beginning, the gi was not white, it was more brown-grey. Now, being white, it remembers as all in a symbolic way, that we are all the same even though our belts have different colors (this was later introduced by Jigoro Kano, the founder ofJudo). White is the color of purity, innocence, light, goodness, heaven, safety, brilliance, illumination, understanding, cleanliness, faith, beginnings, spirituality, humility, sincerity and protection. It makes us all one.Later, Sosai added the Kyokushin kanji, which is not only decoration. It is a powerful symbol with amazing meanings which transforms our gi in a sacred garment. Our gi becomes a temple that we wear. It becomes a reminder of the way we are on. It makes us sit straight, it imposes a positive, spiritual attitude.

You cannot dance in your gi, you cannot behave like a punk, you must wear it with dignity and respect. It is disrespectful to wear it open, with your belt behind your neck, as we see so many times. The gi makes a big difference between martial arts, budo, and other sports. It is a reminder that we are on a spiritual way, not only on a physical one. This symbolic function should make us treat it with greater respect, and that’s why, sometimes I am sad to see that more and more people prefer technical clothes in training instead of the gi. We lose all what’s sacred and we become completely materialistic.

Wallmen Harris

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com